Archive for the ‘Papilio’ Category

DesignLab 1.0.8 and RetroCade 1.3 Released!

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

We just completed a new release of DesignLab and RetroCade Synth.

DesignLab 1.0.8 has the following changes:

DesignLab 1.0.8 – 2017.01.04
[DesignLab Libraries]
-Added a new Video Audio Player example.
-Fixes for RetroCade Synth libraries.

RetroCade Synth 1.3 has the following changes:

1/4/2017      Version 1.3.1
-Fix for some LCDs that have contrast issues.

4/21/2015      Version 1.3
-Updated MIDI library to better handle NoteOffs.
-Moved to ZPUino 2.0 with a DesignLab schematic.

1/29/2014      Version 1.2
-Moved to Papilio Schematic Library and drew up a schematic of the RetroCade system.
-Added Analog mode to the LCD.
-Made joystick interaction for smallFS more intuitive. Cannot do the same for SD Card access without a lot of rework…

 

Start Playing With Your Papilio Pro Logic Analyzer!

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016

https://youtu.be/D7FWUJoVaIc

If right now you are kind of what is this guy talking about? Then you should check this and learn one of the almost infinite applications of a Papilio Pro.

Today, we bring an article that explains one use for your brand new Papilio Pro Logic Analyzer. This is to capture the communication via I2C between a Bus Pirate and the fuel gauge chip on the Fuel Tank BoosterPack.

This article is part 2 of a series of 3. Read article one to get all the details about setting up the project and then start playing with your Papilio Pro Logic Analyzer to capture all the traffic. Enjoy!

By Jan Cumps´Blog

Remember Playing Cowboys With A “Hand” Gun? Now It´s a Video Game

Thursday, December 31st, 2015

shooter game

Thanks to the work developed by a group of students at Cornell University, all you would need to do is to paint the tip of your finger in Red. This is not to fake that you are shooting that much that your finger is burning. This is because their project is based on this color. Feel free to adapt it to you likes as it is all open source.

This article presents a thorough description of their work. Read it to learn how you can use the power of an FPGA´s parallel processing to build your own shooters game.

All you need is a video camera to capture the movement of your hand and then output the NTSC signal that is processed by the FPGA board (like a Papilio). Finally, the VGA controller will output the signal to the VGA monitor. Otherwise you wouldn´t know where to shoot!

Oh! And of course, you need to read this and thank the Cornell guys for their great work!

Sayonara baby!

By Jeff Mu and Edgar Munoz